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Update by user Sep 20, 2016

I, the user known as Walmartguy, did not write this review. Yet it, along with other reviews, are showing up on my userpage under my username and I cannot delete them. I have never even written any review on this site, I only reply to posts.

Original review posted by user Sep 02, 2016

The customer is always right even when they are wrong. That is what I have always been told.

That means just that. The customer is king as the way it should be. They are your whole reason of existence. If you don't like that then find another job.

Very simple as a matter of fact. No joking around. There are other jobs out there. You are there for the customer.

Without the customer you would have to do something else anyway.

Remember that. Since this site wants a 100 words minimum I guess I will keep typing for a bit to meet the requirement when I could just sum up what I have to say in a few sentences.

Reviewer is in unhappy mood. Please immediately contact the author of this review to discuss a product or service. Walmart needs to read this review and look into the issue (if any) according to poster's claims.

Other people also mentioned a product or service in their reviews. You may find this information helpful for further shopping at Walmart. You can also consider other company suggested by the author: Target.

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Anonymous
Moscow, Idaho, United States #1211095

"the customer is always right" is a concept from 75 years ago, and is nonsense in the modern world. Too many examples out there of crooked and disrespectful "customers".

I never say this wrong concept to my store employees, and I keep a long list of "customers" who are never allowed in my store.

unfairhiringprastices
Waltham, Massachusetts, United States #1207774

While the customer is in charge, if they act like apes(probably like you would) any business has a right to refuse service and tell you to get the *** out.

Peter99
to unfairhiringprastices Kutztown, Pennsylvania, United States #1207780

You have personal experience in this don't you. From what I understand you have been kicked out of Walmart for calling a developmentally delayed employee a retard and harassing and bullying her.

So while I agree that the person who made this post is probably one of those that thinks that the world revolves around them.(or is making a troll review). You are a bad customer yourself.

realm188
Mannford, Oklahoma, United States #1207771

I see that you are still on this ***. I have worked with people that have left jobs because something about their employer has made their mental health go.

I do not work for Walmart. But even if I did, any boss of mine is gonna show me some respect whether they like me or not. As the others have said, the moment you flat out disrespect an employee is the moment that you lose the privilege to be right. If you don't like their service, maybe you should shop at a convenience store where you'll be paying more and they'll ban you if you're rude.

Maybe you think that they're kings. It's just a thought. But even a king must be good or he has nothing. Even a king must take responsibility.

I don't know about others, but I'm not living just to work my life away. Money is going to come and go whether insignificant *** like you are around or not. No one on this planet is paid enough to take the *** off of your lips and risk their life for you or anyone else that doesn't even care about them. We are not born knowing everything.

No matter where we work, we're still human beings with feelings and we have families. You're trying to get all these people to gain a new attitude that should never even exist.

Like I said, even a king must be good or he has nothing. Being told that all of your life doesn't make it any less of a lie...

unfairhiringprastices
to realm188 Waltham, Massachusetts, United States #1207778

All a king ever does is sit on a throwne and chop people's heads off if he does not like them.

snugglegirl05
Houston, Texas, United States #1207423

Ok...

Then please read this...

Money isn’t everything. Not even close.

We’ve all had customers or clients who have unrealistic expectations of what we can or should do to keep them happy. They demand – whether explicitly or implicitly – more of our time, energy and resources than our other clients.

Don’t be afraid to cut ties with customers or clients who repeatedly make unrealistic demands or who consistently cause stress or friction.

Rather than continually sacrificing your time, dignity and emotional health, focus your efforts on actively pursuing new customers or clients who respect your time and boundaries.

Look at the bigger picture when dealing with consistently unreasonable customers or clients. Look at what’s really important, and ask yourself if repeatedly attempting to please an unpleasable customer is really the best business decision.

Anonymous
#1207164

Respect rules over everything. A customer loses their privilege to be right when they disrespect the employee.

Just as the employee loses their privilege to a job if they disrespect the customer. Respect trumps everything.

snugglegirl05
to Anonymous Houston, Texas, United States #1207173

I agree

snugglegirl05
Houston, Texas, United States #1207152

Ok...

Then please read this...

2. This mindset positions employees against customers and management.

If you’re lucky enough to have found employees who you trust and respect, don’t risk losing them by siding with the customer by default.

When you tell your employees “the customer is always right”, you immediately position them against the customer – and the customer always wins.

If you want to keep your employees happy and effective, back them up. Prove to them that you respect their judgment and opinions, and when faced with siding with your employee or an unreasonable customer, always choose your employee.

According to Alexander Kjerulf, author of Happy Hour is 9 to 5, happy employees lead to the best possible customer service: “Believing the customer is always right is a subconscious way of favouring the customer over the employee which can lead to resentment among employees. When managers put the employees first, the employees will then put the customers first. Put employees first and they will be happy at work”.

Putting employees first may also lead to an increase in perceived control among employees. And according to Ravi Tangri, author of Stress Costs, Stress Cures: How to Recover Productivity Lost to Stress, this increased control can have very concrete benefits: “Workers with high levels of perceived control are not as likely to report high levels of conflict or interference between work and their family lives. The more control an employee feels over his own health and over things that happen to him at work, the less likely he is to report absences totaling six days or more in the previous year.” 3. Money isn’t everything.

Not even close. We’ve all had customers or clients who have unrealistic expectations of what we can or should do to keep them happy. They demand – whether explicitly or implicitly – more of our time, energy and resources than our other clients. It was recently reported that Chicago-based ad agency Cramer-Krasselt fired big-name client Panera Breads because of a poor working relationship.

In a leaked internal memo, the agency claimed that the troubled working relationship just wasn’t worth it. In the memo, Peter Krivkovich, chairman-CEO of Cramer-Krasselt wrote: “There comes a time when no matter what the acclaim for the work, no matter what that visibility, no matter how good of a relationship we have with the marketing department…in the end, no amount of money makes it worthwhile.” Don’t be afraid to cut ties with customers or clients who repeatedly make unrealistic demands or who consistently cause stress or friction. Rather than continually sacrificing your time, dignity and emotional health, focus your efforts on actively pursuing new customers or clients who respect your time and boundaries. Final Thoughts Just because your customers aren’t always right, doesn’t mean you can’t learn from them.

I love the Bill Gates quote: “Your most unhappy customers are your greatest source of learning.” If you have a customer or client who is seemingly impossible to please, learn from them; this doesn’t mean you need to keep them as a customer, but ask yourself what you can do differently in the future to avoid a similar problem. I would also like to note that I’m not suggesting we simply give up on resolving conflict with customers.

I’m simply saying this: Look at the bigger picture when dealing with consistently unreasonable customers or clients. Look at what’s really important, and ask yourself if repeatedly attempting to please an unpleaseable customer is really the best business decision.

snugglegirl05
Houston, Texas, United States #1207149

Ok....

Then please read this...

How many times have you had to grit your teeth, take a deep breath and silently repeat to yourself, “The customer is always right”? This is a motto that’s drilled into every young retail or hospitality worker, and has somehow made its way into the psyches of established business owners.

The problem is, the customer isn’t always right, and always thinking otherwise can result in serious disservice to you, your employees, and your customers.

Here’s why.

1. Unreasonable customers eat away at your finite resources.

You only have limited resources available to you; don’t allocate a disproportionate amount of them to customers who repeatedly cause problems. You only have so much time, money and energy to dedicate to customer service, or to your business, and an unreasonable customer or client can quickly eat away at the majority of it. If you’ve tried your best to address a complaint and the customer still isn’t happy, it’s time to move on from that customer.

Use your limited resources to address the concerns of customers who are willing to engage in reasonable dialogue with you. When you focus on meeting the needs of your reasonable customers, you build loyal brand ambassadors…and I’d rather have a bunch of these than throw all my resources at customers who are impossible to please.

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